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Archive for the ‘technique’ Category

In between majors, golf on TV can be prosaic. Lack of name players. Tournaments that mean little. Competition from other sports. Decreasing interest in golf throughout the country, except for the majors. I, for one, find it both entertaining and instructional watching golf on TV between majors. I often turn off the sound, read a book or Sunday paper, and occasionally look up to study swings, strategies,attitudes, and scores on the PGA, LPGA, and European tours. First, check out Mike Ritz, announcing for the Euro tour these days. ┬áHe’s the Vin Scully of golf: dynamic, exciting, play by play, with great background info. This guy makes Frederick Anderson Hed look interesting. How about more Mike Ritz announcing for the PGA Tour? Then there’s Kevin Na. Other than John Daly, Na is golf’s biggest potential train-wreck. He badly screws up one shot and is guaranteed to screw up the next four, or more. You can see his mind twisting, churning, and gears grinding until metal hits metal and his teeth start gnashing. It’s the pace that showcases the mind. He gets real speedy over three-foot par putts, way out of his routine. For those few moments, he’s given up, the death knell for a professional golfer. Na’s a record holder around this behavior. He made a 16 on one venture into the woods last year at the Texas Open (only JD’s beat him with an 18 once). Take a look at what Na does during these meltdowns, and don’t play that way. Take a deep breath after a poor shot. Get back into your routine, your pace, your rhythm. Re-find your game. This year, Na got to +7 at the Texas Open and withdrew. Here are a few other tips I picked up watching golf (more…)

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I’m not much of a dancer, but when I get out on the dance floor with my wife, I depend less on technique and mostly on my rhythm to get by. My parents on the other hand were champion ballroom dancers, employing both technique and rhythm to win titles (they were fine musicians too–my mother, a great pianist and singer, and my father, a percussionist who could even find rhythm in a washboard). In golf, technique is essential, but good rhythm seals the deal. And keeping good rhythm as the round progresses is one of the hardest elements of the game to maintain. The reason it’s tough is that rhythm is affected by so many subtle things. There are the external elements like wind, heat, cold, rain, mud, and the big bomber gorilla you’re playing with. And there are the internal factors like concentration, focus, presentness, pain, and the rent check you forgot to send off. Of course good technique is vital, but without good rhythm, good technique alone won’t cut it. And with good rhythm, bad technique won’t either. For technique, see a PGA pro or buy a good app for your smart phone. For rhythm, pick the club you’re most comfortable with, (more…)

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