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Posts Tagged ‘Buddhist’

I was watching the first couple of tournaments recently and was astounded at how lackluster the field was. I would guess the ratings were in the tank, as the only things that would draw viewers were the warm venues. Personally, I tuned into the match between Sam Snead and Bob Hope instead of seeking out David Toms and Mark Wilson. Over at the Champions Tour, there was Brad Bryant apologizing for his 65, more surprised than anyone that he chipped and putted his way to the top of the leaderboard. Tiger hadn’t started his season yet, flying off to Dubai for a huge appearance fee and a joust with the crackerjacks of the European Tour. This blog has predicted he will win just about everything this year, and has advised him to do so then quit competitive golf and concentrate on his foundation. Bobby Jones did this, as did Byron Nelson, and they had no sex scandals to face down. Whether Tiger stays or goes, professional golf goes downhill. He could stay and dominate, or he could go and fade away. Either way, golf suffers. The current crop in their late 20s and early 30s are not strong enough to hold up the high bar of professional golf on all levels of accomplishment. Woods was the last of the lot, and look at the bloody mess he left behind, an irreparable heap of emotional horsecrap laying by the side of the road. And please, don’t feed me all the sanctimonious BS about Tiger haters. I don’t hate Tiger. I’m angry at him for taking himself down along with the game he built up.

Golf requires what the Buddhists call impeccability, which is (more…)

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You’ve heard it said time after time by touring pros: I just have to be patient, when asked what they’re plan is for the upcoming round. But what exactly does that mean, especially in a society where few people seem to know what it means to be patient?  How many patient drivers have you seen lately? How many patient fans have you seen at the ballpark? Who’s patient at the DMV? And what about the foursome behind you? Were they patient when you last checked?

It is no easy thing to be patient. It has long been a virtue, as Emerson wrote in the mid 19th century,”Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience”.* I learned about patience on Buddhist retreats, (more…)

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These interviews were not everything I was suggesting in my last post, but they were on the right track. They take the onus off the Masters media to provide all the answers, and so more free up the Masters to focus on golf. This is a good thing. Thank you to all involved.

As a Buddhist, I also know what it’s like to stop meditating at times. This human plane is a difficult one, involving many decisions, desires, disappointments, and challenges. Without meditation or prayer of some kind, it’s a perilous journey. We need help…often. We need support. And when we fall from grace…and we all do at times…we need forgiveness. Tiger Woods is a fellow human being, a fellow Buddhist, a fellow golfer, and I wish him well in his struggle to return to that Middle Way that provides such a wonderful beacon to light the Path.

In the Dharma.

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I am a great driving range player. I have my off days but for the most part I look like a pro on the range. In fact, people sometimes come up and compliment me on my swing, asking how I developed it. What I’m thankful for is that they usually don’t follow that up inquiring about my handicap. For, as we well know, playing great on the range does not guarantee playing great on the course. The problem, I think, is physical and mental, perhaps even spiritual, when you consider the nebulous arena of concentration. At any rate, all of these factor into preparing to play the game of golf.

We get into a kind of mini-groove on the range. We get comfortable and relaxed. We get confident. The lies are nearly perfect. We are fresh and alert, and only need to reach over and rake another ball to the hitting area. Fatigue is a minor problem, a factor nearer to the end of the bucket. Unless you’re practicing with a buddy, no one is talking to you between shots. Your concentration is solid. You are deep into golf meditation.You have your off days at the range. A personal problem may be distracting you. A physical problem may be the cause, throwing off your concentration. Still, it is easier to establish or regain concentration at the range than on the course.

Concentration is focusing on one thing at a time in such a way (more…)

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